Overture Cover Reveal

Here’s the cover for Vanessa Couchman’s latest, Overture, the first in a trilogy set in France between 1897 and 1945. And it’s now on pre-order on Amazon in Kindle format!

Vanessa Couchman

I’ve reached a very exciting stage in the genesis of my latest novel, Overture. I can now reveal the cover, and the Kindle version is on pre-order on Amazon.

As ever, my designer JD Smith has come up with a great cover design, which I believe really conveys the flavour of the Belle Epoque period in France.


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Historical Fiction Cover Competition April 2019

Ocelot Press author Cathie Dunn’s latest title, A Highland Captive, is the winner in this month’s Historical Fiction Cover Competition. Congratulations, Cathie! It’s a great read, too.

Pam Lecky

What draws you to a historical fiction book cover? 

Welcome to my monthly historical fiction cover competition. I hope you find some new books and authors for your ‘must read’ list. If a cover interests you, just click on the link to learn more about the book.

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A Novel Approach 2: One month countdown!

The second novel-writing workshop from Ocelot Jennifer C. Wilson, taking place on Saturday 6th April. Tickets are available now; read on for more information.

Jennifer C. Wilson

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There’s something particularly exciting about seeing your workshops on a poster in the local library!

Last month, we had a fun session on “getting started” on the novel journey, and next month, on Saturday 6th April 2019, we’re going to be looking at all things “casting”, i.e. getting those pesky characters right, and onto the page!

Whether you’re writing heroic heroes or villainous, well, villains, they all need to be rounded, well thought-out, and identifiable as individuals. After all, there’s nothing worse than reading a piece of fiction and simply not being able to tell anyone apart, or finding everyone dull and unengaging.

Well, come along to my next workshop, and we’ll start tackling these things. We’ll talk about descriptions, dialogue, and creating believable characters who really help enhance those story ideas you have bubbling away.

No experience is necessary, and it doesn’t matter what sort of writing you enjoy…

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Fictional Versus Real Settings in Novels

Ocelot Press author Vanessa Couchman tells us how she approaches the issue of whether to use real or fictional placenames in her novels.

Vanessa Couchman

Saint-Florent, Corsica Saint-Florent on the island of Corsica appears in my books under a different name.

A sense of place in fiction is very important to me, both in my own work and in the novels I read. Some of my favourite authors, such as Hannah Kent, Helen Dunmore and Tracy Chevalier, excel at weaving the setting seamlessly into the story. Novels are about people, of course, but they are the product of their environment and culture, so the setting is an indispensable part of the story.

But should you write about real places or make them up? There is no right answer and pros and cons exist to both of those alternatives.

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A Novel Approach – One month to go!

Ocelot Press author Jennifer C. Wilson is running a series of writing workshops in North Shields, UK, starting in February. If you live in that part of the world, this is an opportunity not to miss. And at £15 per session, it’s a bargain.

Jennifer C. Wilson

In one month, on the 9th February, I’ll be hosting the first of six workshops I have planned in North Shields Library over the coming year, as part of my ‘A Novel Approach’ series, and I cannot wait.

person uses pen on bookAs both an attendee and organiser, I absolutely adore writing workshops, of any style or genre, and at any level. There’s just something about starting with a blank page, being given a prompt, and feeling that spark of creativity strike, and the ink start to flow. As an organiser especially, seeing everyone, heads-down, pens rushing across the page, is a wonderful feeling. It means you’ve explained the prompt sufficiently for one thing!

That’s why I decided to organise my own series. Over the course of the first workshop, we’ll be looking at initial idea-generation, how to get those ideas into something resembling a plot, and other ways of getting…

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